It’s Ok to Slap a Woman as Long as its Over a Baptism Dispute

Meet footballer (that’s AMERICAN footballer) Cedric Wilson: former wide receiver for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Why former? Dude hit his girlfriend, apparently out at a bar. Fair enough. Not acceptable behavior on the Steelers.

Now meet linebacker James Harrison:

On March 8, Harrison was charged with assaulting his girlfriend, Beth Tibbot, in her Ohio Township home. According to a police affadavit, Harrison broke down a door, broke Tibbot’s cell phone in half as she attempted to call 911, then slapped her face with an open hand, knocking off her glasses. He was charged with simple assault and criminal mischief and faces an April 3 preliminary hearing before a magistrate in Bellevue.(emphasis added)

Sounds like some pretty messed up behavior, no? Well, according to the teams’ chairman, Harrison’s place on the team is secure, because he had a good reason. What reason? Here’s the chairman’s explanation:

“What Jimmy Harrison was doing and how the incident occurred, what he was trying to do was really well worth it,” Rooney said of Harrison’s initial intent with his son. “He was doing something that was good, wanted to take his son to get baptized where he lived and things like that. She said she didn’t want to do it.”

Now, I know believers have every reason to think that baptisms are good and important things to do to their children. But I hope everyone, believer or non, would still agree that baptisms are not exactly the sort of immediate emergency situation that would make it “really well worth it” to break through a door, destroy a cell phone being used by a frightened woman to dial the police, and slap that woman in the face.

HT: Feministing and Skepchick.

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7 Responses to It’s Ok to Slap a Woman as Long as its Over a Baptism Dispute

  1. Iggy says:

    Gah?

    I think my head exploded.

    Why is this not better known? And isn’t preventing someone from calling 911 a felony?

    WTF
    Wtf, indeed.

  2. doubtingmoab says:

    WTF?
    Apparently, btw, interrupting a 911 call in Ohio is just a misdemeanor (per 2002 report)

    http://www.cga.ct.gov/2002/olrdata/jud/rpt/2002-R-0891.htm

    I’m not sure that one should loose their job over criminal acts that do not impact their job performance (i.e. someone caught drunk driving shouldn’t loose their job as a software developer) with the exception of those who hold electable positions.

    I think the biggest deal here (besides that the guy is an idiot and that woman was abused – oh and his manager is a bigger idiot) is that we should not expect sports folks to act any better than we would expect any other joe to act. Loose his job? Would you expect a landscaper to loose his?

    Finally – I think the penalty should be bigger. Breaking and entering sounds good…where is that on that list? Gimmie a break.

  3. doubtingmoab says:

    Wanted to add – apparently in Ohio it IS a felony.

  4. doubtingmoab says:

    WTF?
    Apparently, btw, interrupting a 911 call in Ohio is just a misdemeanor (per 2002 report)

    (had to take a link out to avoid spam filter)

    I’m not sure that one should loose their job over criminal acts that do not impact their job performance (i.e. someone caught drunk driving shouldn’t loose their job as a software developer) with the exception of those who hold electable positions.

    I think the biggest deal here (besides that the guy is an idiot and that woman was abused – oh and his manager is a bigger idiot) is that we should not expect sports folks to act any better than we would expect any other joe to act. Loose his job? Would you expect a landscaper to loose his?

    Finally – I think the penalty should be bigger. Breaking and entering sounds good…where is that on that list? Gimmie a break.

  5. theharbinger says:

    Well here’s the thing, it’s not that he’s a bad football player just because he’s a misogynist piece of shit. So if the team is worried solely about performance, then his job should be secure. But if we think a little harder we will realize that it comes down to publicity. Teams are essentially corporations, and like any other corporation must maintain a clean image to be viewed as legitimate. So the importance of him not being fired lies in its implications both for the values of the team-owners, and in how those values are rooted in the values of fans. And THAT is what disturbs me profoundly.

  6. How can they cover up for the dude? Can’t believe it. I thought we were getting into an era where we hold athletes responsible.

  7. Wow. Thanks for spreading word about this, Bad.

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